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ActionDescription
Create data setMake a new, blank data set. After creation you'll have to go in and add data to it.
Upload dataMake a new data set and immediately start populating it with data from xml, csv, Excel, or just cut/paste it in.
Upload from data sourceUse a prebuilt connector to access data in other systems like Projector, Salesforce, LinkedIn, or even your own databases.
Map charts GeoDataGeodata maps let you combine point locations, like cities - or region outlines, like country borders, with information in another data set. These create powerful geomap visualizations. Your installation includes a few GeoMaps by default. You can add your own if you wish. Please contact Projector support if you need assistance.
Data changes monitoringIf you have specified an email alert on your data sets, then you can review all of your own alerts here.
Transformation scriptsIf your organization has special scripts that they run on imported data to format or alter it, then you can review those special scripts here.
Database connections libraryIf your organization connects to custom SQL databases accessed over the web, then this library describes all of those connections.


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Data Set Details

So far you have been introduced to the major ideas around data sets. Permissions, management, sharing. This section details actual features.

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Data Set Summary

The summary page shows you past imports, the status of those imports (success, failure) and details about what was imported. It also lists all the reports tied to this data set. From this page you can:

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Attributes are columns in a data set that describe data. For example, imagine Tim in New York earned you five thousand dollars. Resource and Location are attributes. They describe the five thousand dollars. Dates are also considered attributes. The corollary to attributes are indicators. Indicators are discussed a couple sections further down.

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Actions

IconNameDescription

Add new attributeCreate a new attribute. If this data set is part of joined data sets, then this is the only way you should add attributes. You can also add attributes through import templates, but if you use that method it won't update the joined tables.

NameThe name of the attribute. duh.

CodeThis code is used to access the attribute for use in formulas. For example, value('L_ACTIVITY_TEXT'). Attributes always start with "L_" and are capitalized. It is also used when creating parameters for project workspaces.

ETL column name

ETL is short for extract, transform, load, three database functions that are combined into one tool to pull data out of one database and place it into another database.

The ETL name is used to migrate data from one database to another. When you import data from external systems, those systems likely have their own column names different than the one you use in ProjectorBI. For example, Projector reports use Resource Display Name and ProjectorBI uses Resource for brevity. ETL name is the bridge between your data source and your data set columns. Your ETL names and data source column names should match. In this way, you can change the names of your attributes and indicators, without breaking your import.

Custom Member

Custom members are assigned to an attribute. You specify what values contribute to that grouping. Finally, when drilling down on that value in a chart or table, the custom member name will be shown. This is complex, so I'll do my best to give a real world example.

Let's say you have an attribute called Resource Title. You want to drill down on Resource Title in a chart, so you do that. You end up with something that looks like this:

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Now what if you wanted to group two of those categories together? Let's group Jr. Technical Consultant and Sr. Technical Consultant into one bar called 'Technical Consultants.'

  1. Add a new custom member to 'Resource Title'
  2. Set the custom member conditions to include Title = Jr. Tech Cons and Title = Sr. Tech Cons
  3. Rerender your chart, now it has a new category with this custom grouping

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Custom members are not only limited to the drill-down member's values. You can drive a custom member by other attribute values too. For example, my 'Technical Consultants' group may be composed of specific engagements, or a combination of engagements and titles.

Custom members are also useful for forcing disparate data into a drill down. For example, I have a table that shows revenue by cost center, but I want to also show revenue by contract type at the same level. I’d create three custom members at the cost center level. One for T&M, one for NTE, and one for FP.  

The result is my table shows revenue by cost center by default, with two special rows that show revenue by contract type.  It might look like: 

East:  50k
West: 125k
North: 25k
South: 75k
T&M/NTE: 200k
FP: 75k


SubsetCreate a group of like attribute values. For example, you have many expense types. Airfare, Taxi, Hotel, Licensing, Entertainment, etc. You create a subset of Airfare,Taxi, and Hotel and call them "Travel." Now your report editors can easily create visualizations for the subset in one click.
Appearance and Translation

This button really does two things. First, it lets you set the default colors for attributes. For example, you have a low, medium, high priority list. Set them to green, yellow, red colors by default. The colors are then reflected in reports that include them. Colors can be overridden on a per report basis as needed.

Second, you can translate the name of the attribute for different languages. For example, Spanish users would see "pasaje aéreo" instead of "airfare."

Visibility

Hide this attribute from the user interface. When a user browses a data set, this column will be hidden. When a report editor creates a report, this attribute won't be shown in selection lists. Nor will it be available in formulas. However, any existing report that uses it already will continue to use it.

You might use this if you have an old report column that should no longer be used. So you hide it from view.

Transform Attribute Values

Use a formula to transform all existing values in the data set to new values. For example, if a name field was formatted Last Name, First Name - you could switch the two.

This is a one time transformation. If you want to automatically transform values on all incoming data, you'll need to do so via the import template instead.

Restrict Access to UsersAny view that uses this attribute is not rendered. Instead users are shown "You don't have permission to see this view." By default, attributes are viewable by anyone. Once lock is enabled, that logic is flipped. It is available to nobody except for people on the view list. Useful when you have information that only a select group of people should view. For example, Resource Pay Category is restricted to management.
FilterWhen displaying a view, filter the data set to match the logged in user. For example, you have a data set which contains salary for each user. With a filter, the logged in user can only see their own salary.
DeleteDelete the attribute.

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Drill down paths are a very cool feature. When building reports, you'll often need to provide users a way of drilling into the details. For example, a report shows revenue by engagement. Users drill down into an individual engagement to see it broken down by project. Here at the dataset level you create a tree view of these drill downs for use later on. In the screenshot below you can see that I have a single parent node which then branches off to two children. When report creators add a view, they'll be presented with this branching structure. By clicking on one of the nodes, the view automatically builds the drilling path for them.

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Example screenshot of picking a drill down path during view creation. The light blue nodes are the path that will be used.

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Indicators

Indicators are numbers. For example, hours, revenue, or contract amount. Attributes describe those numbers. For example, the project revenue sits on. Because 

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Actions

IconNameDescription

Create Indicator

Create a new indicator. If this data set is part of joined data sets, then this is the only way you should add indicators. You can also add them through import templates , but if you use that method it won't update the joined tables.

When you create an indicator, you can optionally specify a formula. Logically, you might assume this adds a new column of data. For example, you have existing indicators Rate and Hours. You make add a formula indicator for Revenue = M_RATE * M_HOURS. Now I would have a new column with Revenue values in it. But that is not how this works. Rather, it is just a shortcut for creating an indicator formula for report editors. It shows aggregated Rate * Hours and never shows individual row data. If you need row level data, then use an Import Template instead. This creates a real column in the data set. If you still want to use a formula, see ForEachRow instead.


Create a group of indicatorsYou can create groups of indicators for ease of adding them to views. For example, group system rate, contract rate, and standard rate together. Then all three are added to a report at once. Some views also require indicator groups for display purposes. You don't have to create your groups here. You can create them on a per dashlet basis if you want.

NameThe name of this indicators as shown to report editors

Code/FormulaThis code is used to access the indicator for use in formulas . For example, M_Hours * M_Rate = Revenue. Indicators always start with "M_" and are capitalized.

ETL Column NameWhen you import data from external systems, those systems likely have their own column names different than the one you use in ProjectorBI. For example, Projector reports have "Resource Display Name." But in ProjectorBI you might just call your attribute "Resource." ETL name is the bridge between an ProjectorBI column and data source columns. That way when your attributes/indicators change names, or your source data columns change order, the import template can still figure out how to map between them. For example, you have source columns A, B, C. They map to attributes Time, Hours, Revenue. If you change the column order to C, B, A - ProjectorBI won't be fooled. It will check the ETL name and ensure the data goes to the correct attribute/indicator.
TranslationTranslate the name of the indicator for different languages. For example, Spanish users would see "dolares" instead of "dollars."
Visibility

Hide this indicator from the user interface. When a user browses a data set, this column will be hidden. When a report editor creates a report, this attribute won't be shown in selection lists. Nor will it be available in formulas. However, any existing report that uses it already will continue to use it.

You might use this if you have an old report column that should no longer be used. So you hide it from view.

Transformation

Use a formula to transform all existing values in the data set to new values. For example, if data came in featuring a lot of trailing decimals (1.0023940390403), you could round all the values to two decimal places.

This is a one time transformation. If you want to automatically transform values on all incoming data, you'll need to do so via the import template instead.

LockAny view that uses this indicator is not rendered. Instead users are shown "You don't have permission to see this view." By default, indicators are viewable by anyone. Once lock is enabled, that logic is flipped. It is available to nobody except for people on the view list. Useful when you have information that only a select group of people should view. For example, RDC information is only available to management.
DeleteDelete the indicator

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